Childhood Cafe: Inspired by The Hummingbird Cafe

Inspired by: The Hummingbird Bakery

Childhood Cafe

written by Ayesha Charles

Recession and depression has fuelled my regression,

back to a time when in life, all was fine,

I played with Barbie dolls and fluffy haired trolls,

and the highlight of my week was the bags of penny sweets,

Baking with my mum was priceless and fun,

Eating cakes and pastries until I felt sugar high and hazy,

Life grew older with me caught in its tide,

And washed me up somewhere where something has died,

Youth and naivety,

behind me, in the distance, I sadly miss,

Wisdom and pride fight to make my life stiff,

The future fills me with impending anxiety,

And a longing for my childhood spirit and vitality,

So I sneak to the Hummingbird Cafe,

When I’m in need of comfort and off diet day,

Cupcakes with treats and all things sweet,

sprinkles and trinkets to make my cake twinkle,

love and passion has turned my little bake into a fashion,

My place in the storm, with cupcakes so stylish,

Makes me feel, for that moment, pleasantly childish.

Jazz Baby – Inspired by Gucci Spring Summer Collection 2012

Jazz Baby

by Ayesha Charles

Gucci dress from Gucci spring summer collection 2012
Gucci summer collection 2012

Trumpets drone and Jazz music plays

Flappers flick their legs, with a martini haze,

They tap their T-bar shoes as they jiggle and shake

In slinky tube dresses with low slung waists,

Feathers and sparkles show opulent taste

And bejewelled cloche hats illustrates an impertinent face,

With lined doll like eyes that ignite the night

They dance the Charleston with no end in sight,

They embrace a gathering as it were a surprise

And celebrate being a Dame like receiving a prize,

Seeking attention from a Slicker’s roaming eyes

They roll nude stockings half way up their thighs,

They work the party like an actress on stage

Wisecracks and sharp talking like their reading from a page

These little flappers never fail to amaze.

It’s 1920, it’s the prohibition, it’s the Jazz Age.

London, Fashion, Weak: A Fashion Anecdote

Fashion Illustration by Jean-Philippe Delhomme

Without making any impact or holding any significance to the thing, ashamedly, she had noted, she took a revolting pride at her being here. She was aware she didn’t belong, she had no admission, she barely recognised herself in the thing and the thing only painstakingly and reluctantly recognised her. But for the greater good of her life, her success and everything she wanted to embody she challenged the thing every day and the thing challenged her back just as hard. She loved it and uncontrollably embraced it, but as she became better acquainted she began to distinguish the chinks and had forlornly accepted that this was a merciless and non reciprocal love, unhealthy and highlighting the malevolent vanity that resided within her. A vanity so powerful and powerless it fuelled the very ambition that was aflame insider her. She knew that a battle against the thing was one she did not possess the vigour and sanctuary to win, so instead she admired, photographed and wrote about those that belonged, those that it admitted and hoped that one day fashion would recognise her too.

Written by Ayesha Charles

Chanel – La Femme de Chanel, Elle Va Être

Fashion Illustration by Sahara Charles

She was addicted to newness, to novelty and change and succumbed monthly to excess material gain. She hadn’t quite made it to the wonderland of Chanel, so psychologically she imitated a lifestyle sewn so well. At the top of the ladder that equated her success, she would intend only to be or at least dress as the best. Fashion and its folly were her greatest tools that aided her in the trickery of fools. The world understood the tacit language of mode and style, but this never stopped her tools from catapulting her miles. For Chanel she was undoubtedly a devotee and hoped that someday the Chanel woman she would be. Not because she loved the clothes, the cut or the materials, but in Chanel she could no longer be considered an inferior. For this she’d give up trends and impulsive spends, for being perceived without Chanel, after doing so swell, she’d imagine – would be – like living in hell.

A Fashion Anecdote By Ayesha and Sahara Charles